ABOMINATIONS AND TABOOS IN IGBOLAND - ARU

ABOMINATIONS  AND TABOOS IN IGBOLAND - ARU



The Igbos are the people of an ethnic group native to present southeastern Nigeria. There are many taboos/ abominations in Igboland but it unveils as the case prevails. Below are the things considered to be an abomination in the Igboland.

EKE MARKET DAY

There are four Major market days in Igboland which compromises of Eke market day, Orie market day, Afo market day, and Nkwo market day. On market days people take whatever they have available to be purchased to an assigned place meant for that market day. All buyers definitely know where and when to go to the market to make their purchases. Each market day has its own centrality and its very own customary connections.

Eke Market day in Igboland is a unique market day put aside by the ancestors. On that day, no one must go to farmland to take part in any work and there will be in no way wedding functions.  People prefer to go to the market engage in any trade they want and return home to rest for the following day.

EKE (Snake)

There are two sorts of the Eke Snake in Igboland.  One is Eke Orasi and the other is called Eke Uwonya. Eke Orasi is a short python that is common everywhere in Igboland while Eke Uwonya is a big and long Python found in the forest.
Eke Uwonya is consumable yet the short Python can't be slaughtered or eaten in light of the fact that it is forbidden. It is trusted that the Eke Orasi are the children of Orashi stream which is found in Abia, Imo and part of Anambra State. 


Erroneously or deliberately murdering a python means trouble. The act necessitates that the creature should be mourned with grievances of a perished individual. Strange right? Welcome to Igboland.


OSU and UME FAMILIES

 Osu and Ume in Igboland are said to be the general population who were brought from a far land. Significantly, they are being utilized as slaves or offered as a forfeit to the lords of the land. Their obligation is to worship the Idols, serve the Idols, and they are to live in the market where they serve the Idols. These set of individuals are exceptionally innovative and attractive. However, they are not permitted to either wed, participate in gatherings or relationship with the sons of the soil. The sons of the soil are the real offspring of the land. On the off chance that you ask me; I will say the general population from the Igboland are supremacists. Lol! I am simply clowning, it is their way of life, and I respect that.

The Osu and Ume's are from Igboland, their kids grow up and carry on with an extraordinary life. They get hitched to either an individual from their tribe or an individual from different ethnicity. This contention has been on for the longest. The sons of the soil are made to trust that the OSU and UME(s) don't have traditions. As it is trusted that their culture and customs are lost in time.
Despite all of these controversies, in the present day, endeavours have been made to cancel the idea of forbidding them. Shockingly, nothing has enhanced so far in light of the fact that this law was laid down by the ancestors.


NZE and OZO

The Nze is the male while the Ozo is his spouse. They both hold the most noteworthy customary titles in Igboland in the ancient days. They are viewed as the customary priest of the Igboland which makes them get preferences and exemptions from any type of community work. The Nze or Ozo must not venture into a river or stream where individuals are occupying already. At whatever point they want to visit, or utilize the waterways/stream, everyone in that water runs out.

This is to show respect and honour. They are free to utilize the waterway or stream while every other individual stops outside until the point when they are through. On the off chance that it happens that somebody goes along with them in the stream, that individual must assuage the land.

EBURALA

Any chicken or goat that bears one infant is condemned, and its offspring is described to as an EBURALA. It must be slaughtered and eaten once it is matured. On no event should this creature be taken to the market for sale or left to have offsprings. Doing otherwise is considered an abomination in Igboland.


A CHICKEN MUST NOT CROW AT NIGHT

It is an abomination for a Chicken to crow at Night in Igboland. In the event that it does, that fowl must be apprehended and killed for consumption.


GROWING AN UPPER TEETH FIRST.

In the olden days, on the off chance that a baby develops the upper teeth first, or if a child is born with teeth.  Such a child is a bad luck and an abomination in Igboland. The child will be tossed into an evil forest for animal consumption. Note that this demonstration has been abolished in light of the fact that in a long time past, people get things done out of primitivism and absence of comprehension. In a similar vein, twins were been killed yet today nothing of such exists.


ADULTERY

It is considered an abomination in Igboland if a woman lay down with her significant other's sibling. In the event that she takes part in such an act, her better half will die. On the off chance that she takes part in a sexual association with another person, she and her significant other will live in need and want. When an Igbo lady is hitched, she is married forever except in the case of divorce.  I wonder why the Igbo people did not consider creating such a rule to govern the men too. 


KILLING

It is an abomination in Igboland to kill any human; if such an act occurs, the accused person will pay severely for that offence.


GIVING AND RECEIVING

It is an abomination in Igboland to give or receive one item or any Item in an odd-numbered form e.g. 1, 3, 5,7,9........ When presenting or receiving a gift, it must be in pairs e.g. 2,4,6,8,10........... If anyone is been presented with one item as a gift such item is received and been thrown away.
The reason for this is that the Igbos believes that the two (2) represents the breasts of their mother and the multiple of two represents the multiplication of blessings.


WHISTLING WITH THE MOUTH AT NIGHT

You can whistle with your mouth all day but it is an abomination in Igboland to whistle with your mouth at night, it is believed that it is a way of getting the attention of snakes, while others believe it attracts evil spirits. In the olden days, if someone accidentally whistles at night, an elderly person there will rush to the kitchen, pick up a burning wood and throw it outside. That is a sign of appeasing the gods and forestalling the repercussion of that act and the person will say some words, begging and appealing to the ancestors, stating that the offender did the act unknowingly.

DOING BAD TO INLAWS AND THEIR CHILDREN

Doing any kind of evil to this category of people is an abomination in Igboland. Husbands and Children born to sisters or daughters of the Igbo communities are treasured and no form of unpleasantries must be recorded against the family.
Husbands and children of the daughters of the land are automatic members of the family and they have equal rights with the other members of the family. In most cases, they are giving lands to build on for their remembrance. It is called the "mark of Inlaws".


Do well to let me know what you think. By the way, I am an Igbo lady. You can continue by clicking here


You Might Also Like

61 comments

  1. never heard of this eki market day. although sometimes, some places hava taboo and people live with it because they grew up doing these things like their ancestors.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Weldone, Hope to host you soon. Lolz

    ReplyDelete
  3. That a lovely post, I had no knowledge about the community of Igbo people in Nigeria. Such a whole lot of information. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thats an eye opening post. I had never heard any of these.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thank you for sharing such a rich culture.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thank you for sharing, very educational and eye opening!

    ReplyDelete
  7. that is so interesting! Nice to know about different cultures and places!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Thanks for sharing the culture it's very educational :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Wow, it’s a nice community to learn about. Never heard of such a community.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I think every culture has its own set of traditions which are considered taboo... .

    ReplyDelete
  11. This is very informative. Indeed so many things to learn when you are from another part of the hemisphere. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Learnt so many things for the first time starting with Igbos and continuing through the taboos and traditions they follow. Its so fascinating how somethings hold importance in one community. Always new things to learn everyday. Look forward to Part 2 of this post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is up already, however, I intend to merge the two in one.

      Delete
  13. Married to an igbo man, I'm fortunate enough to be be privy to this wealth of info shared here. I just love the igbo culture and feel blessed to be part of it

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks darling. Good to have you here.

      Delete
  14. This post is definitely eye opening about Igbo people in Nigeria

    ReplyDelete
  15. I was not familiar with any of this. Are these traditions still recognized and practiced today? Thank you for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So are still active while some others have been abolished

      Delete
  16. I enjoyed reading this post! It's so informative and interesting that I learned so much about Igbo.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks darling, good to have you here

      Delete
  17. I've never heard of eke market day! Thanks for the informative and interesting post. There is so much to learn about the world and it's great to read about :).

    ReplyDelete
  18. I schooled in Abia State (Umudike to be precise) I did experience a few of this things and somewhat fell in love them. It fueled my decision to marry and Igbo guy even though we didn't sort of work out.
    I'm happy our people are starting to write about our culture to bring the world to Nigeria, to also experience our rich diverse cultural heritage.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Awww darling, thank for your so much love. No to worry, Mr right is on his way.

      Delete
  19. Wow....now, I'm really curious to visit Nigeria! With all this info, I'd love to see how it all goes.

    ReplyDelete
  20. nice post.. I have added to my knowledge

    ReplyDelete
  21. I am amused about the tradition or belief about the snake and chicken. This is so informative. Thanks for sharing. So really knowledgeable.

    ReplyDelete
  22. This is so interesting to learn! I love learning about other cultures' taboos, traditions and beliefs. Is there a part 2?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes there is but I am planning to merge them as one.

      Delete
  23. wow! so interesting! I never knew anything from it. Thank you for giving me new knowledge

    ReplyDelete
  24. A taboo is a part of any culture in Africa and other parts of the world – largely because it brings a sense of sanity and reverence to certain things in the community. We shall be examining 10 taboos or things you shouldn’t do in Igboland or eastern Nigeria and see how these impact the general lives of the people living in these areas.

    ReplyDelete
  25. This is very interesting! I love learning about different cultures, taboos, customs. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  26. This is was interesting and educational! I am always fascinated by taboos in different cultures. Thank you for sharing your knowledge!

    ReplyDelete
  27. I have never heard of this place before but thanks to you for sharing this because you give us a chance to be informed about others cultures and traditions.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Wow, never heard of these traditions but this is fascinating! Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  29. This is a very interesting post. I was not familiar with any of these traditions so I feel like I’ve learnt a lot :) Thanks for sharing!!

    ReplyDelete
  30. Such an informative post on the traditions and the culture. Something I would not have learned unless I read this!

    ReplyDelete
  31. It was fascinating to read about the Igbos and their culture and traditions. I have to admit I didn't know about them tillI read this post.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Wow what an interesting story. Never heard of most of the culture and traditions in here before.

    ReplyDelete

Get My book! You will love it

What are your Thoughts?